doyoutakethisman.com BBB Business Review


Your Ceremony

Not all brides & grooms want a religious wedding.  They seek innovative and indulgent.  Deliberate, yet sprightly.  Their wedding and marriage will focus on them, not a faith.

I will construct your ceremony around you.  Your inside jokes.  Your funny anecdotes.  Your quirks.  Your journey.

Also, I include humor to reduce your anxiety and to engage your guests.

Because…without humor, you risk a parched, tedious lecture in lieu of an enjoyable wedding; and you know people are gonna’ talk.  Do you want your guests lamenting, “that was as nice as the previous 25 weddings we attended?” Or, do you want them extolling, “the newlyweds are quite avant-garde & vivacious to have a stand-up comedian lead their ceremony?”

My Approach

I officiate weddings to the beat of a different drummer.  Innovative, humorous, & gratifying.  I do not read from my script during your ceremony.  This allows me to be mindful of your, and your guests’, reactions, as well as be more engaging.  My delivery is organic, and my goal is to make you look and sound your best on landmark day.  I bring an element of entertainment so your guests and you will enjoy the occasion.  I want your guests to feel included, as if they participated in your wedding, in lieu of just observing from afar.  I will allude to shared experiences and connect your guests emotionally to your milestone.  I want everyone to laugh, to cry, and to think, “wow!”

Weddings vis-à-vis Stand-up Comedy

I perform stand-up comedy and I officiate weddings. I have blended both, written a contemporary-language, dynamic wedding script to lighten the tone of an otherwise rigid ceremony. Reverence need not be dull.  Humor will allow the couple to relax, and it will provide some surprise and entertainment to your guests.

Comedians and officiants stand before guests whom not only have put forth the effort to attend, but also want to enjoy what awaits them. We want every seat occupied and undivided attention towards center stage. Our goal is to illicit an audience response generated by shared experiences. We hope everyone leaves feeling better than when they arrived.

I have learned officiating wedding ceremonies is not about being ecclesiastical; rather, it involves creative writing, leadership, and public speaking.

Creative writing allows me to compose a script both contemporary and representative of the couple. Plenty of tedious, mundane marriage vows, with beastly grammar, exist online. However, the thought of a “show up & throw up” monologue makes me cringe.

Leadership is important because it encourages me to be organized and manage the client-vendor relationship. Couples may not know what ceremony elements are available to them; suggesting options empowers them to broaden their scope. Leadership also includes standing with the couple and their attendants, prompting them to speak and participate during the ceremony.

Speaking of speaking, doing so publicly tolerates zero timidity. The newlyweds-to-be may be the stars of the show, but I will own the stage; my task is to lead them through their ceremony and make them look and sound their best. The opening and greeting must flow freely, unhindered by hesitation, and engaging. The Charge of the Couple may involve the verbal acrobatics of storytelling. Reciting the ring exchange requires cadence. The presentation must be assertive, audible, and comprehensible; no one wants to endure passive, incoherent mumbling.

My Credentials

Although the county clerk offices of Utah do not require me to register as a wedding officiant, I have recorded my business, DoYouTakeThisMan.com, with The State of Utah’s Department of Commerce. I obtained my business license from Salt Lake City Corporation. I am ordained as a Right Reverend through Universal Life Ministries.  Also, I am endorsed as both a Humanist Celebrant and a Humanist Chaplain by the American Humanist Association.  Images of my credentials are available on request.

Questions? Send me a message. Let’s design something that people will still be talking about at your 50th anniversary.

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